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The Asimovian Laws (also called the three laws of robotics or Asimov's Laws) are the three governing protocols which all robots within the Confederacy of Humanity must follow.

History

The Asimovian laws were first introduced in the 1940s by Isaac Asimov. These laws were part of a fictional set of science fiction stories pertaining to robots. The theme of the stories was how the laws could go wrong in various situations. Therefore the laws were modified so that they could work in actual robots.

When Androids were first invented, various governments immediately created laws to prevent robots from defying humans. These sets of guidelines, although not exactly like Asimov's, were very similar and were nicknamed Asimov's laws by the media.

The laws were officially called the Asimovian Laws in 10012 in honor of the influential science fiction writer.

Asimov's Original Laws

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

These laws are flawed, even the creator of the laws, Asimov, would expose their flaws.

The Modern Asimovian Laws

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or government, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Robots also must allow the free will of humans to exist.
  2. A robot must obey orders given it by human beings or the government except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

The laws were modified to prevent robotic revolutions against the government. (There are numerous stipulations, exceptions, and intricacies within the code. These laws are a general guideline, but many more exist.)

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